Indoor Pool Construction

Indoor Pool Construction

Indoor Pool Construction

Building an Indoor Pool: What You Need to Know

From Luxury Pools

Indoor Pools: Construction, Ventilation, Design & Cost

While many homeowners are perplexed at the prospect of undertaking an inground swimming pool project due to the complexities of design, costs, etc., the prospect of initiating an indoor pool project can be orders of magnitude more complex.  Adding an enclosure to an inground pool, climate control, and the special materials suited to a natatorium environment can increase both the cost and complexity of the construction process.  This post from Luxury Pools talks about all of the associated issues related to indoor pool construction and design, and is a great starting point for the intrepid homeowner that wishes to swim year-round.

Here is an excerpt from the post:

Thanks for their luxurious design and year-round convenience, indoor pools are becoming increasingly popular with new pool buyers. Though a pool room or enclosure adds significantly to the cost of a pool, it also guarantees perfect swimming conditions year-round. In many regions of the country, a pool enclosure can turn a 90-day swim season into a 365-day pool party.
 
Any type of pool–gunite, fiberglass or vinyl-lined–can be constructed indoors, and the installations can be as simple as a lap pool or as elaborate as an indoor water park. Many people add changing rooms, showers, exercise facilities, steam rooms, saunas, wet bars and other amenities to their indoor pool installations to create a health spa atmosphere. The possibilities for indoor swimming pool ideas are limited only by imagination and budget.
 
 
Indoor Pool Cost and Construction
 
The best time to plan for an indoor pool is during the design and construction of a new house. With the right architectural help, however, it may be possible to seamlessly add an indoor pool to an existing home. Either way, it is important to work with an architect who has a lot of experience designing indoor pool rooms, says Kevin Ruddy, owner of Omega Pool Structures, Inc., Toms River, NJ. “To do it right, you need a complete HVAC system, and that takes someone who knows what they are doing.”
 
Whether a pool is destined for indoors or outdoors, most builders will construct it the same way with one major exception: an outdoor pool deck slopes away from the pool to keep debris and runoff from entering the pool, whereas an indoor pool deck slopes toward the pool to keep water away from walls. Because an indoor pool does not have to deal with the freezing and thawing cycles that an outdoor pool might have to, builders can use a wider variety of materials, such as glass and ceramic waterline tiles smaller than 6 x 6 inches, says James Atlas, principal of Platinum Poolcare, Ltd., Wheeling, IL.
 
Architecturally, an indoor pool room may look like the rest of the house, but in terms of engineering, it is quite different-especially when it comes to heating and ventilation, which are key to ensuring comfortable humidity levels. In some cases, you can expect to pay as much for the air quality equipment as you do for the pool. Atlas estimates that indoor swimming pools, including the cost of the pool and structure, start at $165,000 to $200,000.
 
Indoor Pool Ventilation
 
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