Extraordinary Popular Delusions, Facts, Fiction and Myths About Swimming Pools

Extraordinary Popular Delusions, Facts, Fiction and Myths About Swimming Pools

Extraordinary Popular Delusions, Facts, Fiction and Myths About Swimming Pools

Swimming Pool Fact vs. Myth

From Swimming Pool Steve

Swimming Pools have possibly generated more urban legends than any other amenity.  Whether it is a real or imagined sensitivity or allergy to chlorine, or it is the legend that water turns colors when urine is introduced, these canards are all explored in this post by Swimming Pool Steve.  Click here to read if you have been spoon fed one of these urban myths in your lifetime!

Here is an excerpt from the post:

“I Am Allergic To Chlorine”

Maybe, but probably not. This is something that pool technicians and water labs hear on a daily basis from customers. If the clients in a pool store were a good market sample then half of the population of North America would be allergic to chlorine. While it is possible that you are allergic to chlorine, as some people actually are, the vast majority of people with this complaint are:

A) Sensitive to pH levels

B) Not balancing their pool properly

Municipal water sources across North America are treated with chlorine and water arriving in your home very likely has a measurable chlorine level. Can you drink water from your tap? Are you able to take a bath or shower in your house? If so – you are very likely not allergic to chlorine. People who switch to bromine or salt water to get away from chlorine exhibit a fundamental misunderstanding of chlorine sanitizer. Salt water is chlorine, and bromine will not solve your problem if you are in fact simply sensitive to imbalance in the acidity of the water. Remember, bears are attracted to people who are allergic to chlorine so always think twice before making this claim…there may be a bear within earshot!

Chemicals For A Pool That Changes Color When You Pee

Don’t Pee In Pool Sign This is true, but in a more accurate way, completely not true. This is one of the largest swimming pool myths but one where the origin is no secret. No self respecting pool owner wants people relieving themselves in your pool since, you know…that is super disguto. In order to prevent this crime against nature a vicious lie was made up by pool owners everywhere claiming that if you pee in the water then the water will change color and everyone will laugh and nobody will like you.

The truth is that there is no such chemical, and you are safe to be as disgusting as you like in someone’s pool. Other than increasing the chlorine demand, as well as the amount of chloramines in the water (which make the chlorine smell), there is no chemical reaction that will happen that will show anyone what you are doing. Releasing some air bubbles by accident might give you away however…

In addition to there not actually being a chemical that can do this currently, there is not likely a chemical to become available any time soon with these properties. The technical challenge associated with changing the color of pool water when you pee are too great – men on the moon…no problem. Pee indicator? Never going to happen.

Test Strips For Testing Pool Water

Testing Pool Water By Eye Are test strips for pool water super convenient – yes. Are they great at testing water chemistry – no, not really. Actually, it depends on what you are testing for. Pool water test strips are great for quick testing to verify if there is any sanitizer in the water or not. They are also good for a very rough estimate of the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness in the water. It is important however to note that there is no true “test strip” method to test the pH of the water – at best a test strip could be considered an approximation test for pH. Even still – any other value in the water that is too far outside of the normal range can result in the rest of the strip not reading correctly. There are many cases where high bromine or chlorine levels can cause burning or bleaching of the test strip invalidating the results.

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