10 Common Sense Tips For Buying A Pool That Many Consumers Ignore

by Kevin Woodhurst, Aquamagazine.com

Shopping like you are buying a car.

Swimming pools are custom construction projects and are built by many individual trades and pool contractors with different standards. All pools are not built the same, unlike an automobile, which is manufactured in a factory under controlled conditions. With a swimming pool, much of what you do not see will impact the cost of pool ownership in the long run.

Not asking enough questions.

Do not assume every builder is going to give you an education, is capable of giving you one or wants to give you one for that matter. Ask many questions. The more you know and understand, the better buyer you will ultimately be. This helps you and your pool contractor. Do your homework. Your resources are endless, so use them.

Paralysis by analysis.

This is when someone gets 10-15 or more estimates for swimming pool construction and then cannot make a decision because they have become so confused. Do your due diligence and get 3 or 4 estimates from reputable swimming pool companies. Then make your decision and go with it.

Here are 10 Reasons to Own a Pool, as listed on aquatechpools.com:

1. THE ENDLESS VACATION

Owning a swimming pool is like being on permanent vacation: it's always a great day and tomorrow will be a great day too. The entire family will think they've moved to paradise.

2. THE ESSENCE ENJOYMENT

A backyard swimming pool is always a fun place. No matter how it is used - for games, for relaxation, or for exercise - the pool experience is pure enjoyment at its finest.

3. KIDS LEARN TO SWIM EARLY

Most children naturally love water. Just wait until they learn to swim! What better, healthier environment is there than a place they can go and be themselves - the fish of the family?

How Germs Get In The Swimming Pool, Scientific American via Huffington Post

By Larry Greenemeier

(Click here for the original article)

As the summer winds down and Labor Day weekend approaches in the U.S., beaches and public pools will be filling up with swimmers looking to take one last dip outdoors before the season ends. Most people will hit the water without worrying about the microscopic organisms they'll be swimming with. Maybe that's for the best, considering what those organisms are and how they're introduced to swimming holes.

The protozoan organism Cryptosporidium, one of the most frequent causes of waterborne disease, has become a major problem in swimming pools, says Charles Gerba, a microbiologist at the University of Arizona who's spent decades studying how pathogens are transmitted. Crypto is a microscopic parasite with a tough outer shell that allows it to survive for days even in properly chlorinated pools.