More Public Swimming Pool Facilities Get Mini Facelifts

Aquatics International | By Kendra Kozen | September 2012

As interest in renovation projects remains high and budgets low, operators and designers are finding creative ways to expand possibilities and meet project goals.

"All facilities must be kept up to date so that the client base continues to visit — and not attend other facilities that are continuing to improve and look to the future for a better aquatic experience," said David Admire, vice president at AdAu Aquatic Engineering in Naples, Fla.

Today, that means utilizing available technology, paying special attention to operational sustainability — and opting for smaller "face-lift" style projects.

Energy-Saving Pool Equipment Choices

While the pump is usually the center of conversations about pool equipment energy savings, other equipment choices also play important roles.

By Jeff Farlow

Program Manager - Energy Initiatives

Excerpt from an article that appeared in The Edge., via pentairpool.com

Filter types, for example, have an impact on energy consumption because they place different levels of resistance on the system. Resistance is related to energy efficiency because of its impact on flow. Of the three types of filters (cartridge, DE and sand), cartridge filtration offers the least (i.e., most favorable) resistance to flow. This is partially because cartridge filters do not require a valve, while filters that are routinely backwashed do need them. Multiport valves create so much resistance to flow that California's Title 24 has banned 1.5-inch multiport valves. (Newer backwash valves have been designed to add less resistance to the system.) On a related note, backwashing consumes water, so using a filter that does not require backwashing conserves water and the chemicals in that water.

It is largely anecdotal, but legend has it that water slides may have originated around the time of the Ancients (as early as the 7th century B.C. by the Assyrians) which would coincide with the invention of modern irrigation systems and specifically the Roman-style aqueduct. Supposedly, laborers working on the construction of aqueducts learned that they could return to the lower levels of the aqueduct by actually riding in them. This concept allegedly also applied to the somewhat more modern logging industry, whereupon loggers built flumes to transport logs to the sawmill as well as to transport themselves. As swimming pools became popular in the United States in the early 20th century, it didn't take long for enterprising construction professionals to begin incorporating this concept into the recreational consciousness of Americans.

The typical residential pool slide has come a long way since the ubiquitous Aqua Slide n Dive of the 1960's and 1970's.

aquaslide

The Aquaslide n Dive, which was a pool owner's only option for many years.